Professor Stride announced as Honorary Fellow of IET

Institution of Engineering and Technology announces 16 Honorary Fellows to mark its 150th year. Professor Stride was awarded the Fellowship in recognition of her contribution to biomedical engineering and research into treatment of major diseases.

Professor Eleanor Stride

Professor Eleanor Stride, Statutory Professor of Biomaterials

Professor Eleanor Stride is one of sixteen world-leading engineers and technologists who have been awarded an Honorary Fellowship from the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) for their outstanding contribution to the engineering and technology industry.

Professor Stride was awarded the Fellowship in recognition of her contribution to biomedical engineering and research into the treatment of major diseases. She says, “Receiving an Honorary Fellowship from the IET was the most wonderful surprise. I’m delighted and honoured and immensely grateful to the IET for its exceptional support of engineering across all its different branches”.

The announcement includes other pioneering female engineers and leading technologists including Kimberly Bryant, Founder of Black Girls CODE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon, Co-founder and CEO of Stemettes and TV personality Dr Hannah Fry, Associate Professor in the Mathematics of Cities.

On awarding the Honorary Fellowships, Professor Danielle George MBE, IET President, said: “I am delighted that we are able to mark the outstanding achievements of these talented individuals in our 150th year, with one of the IET’s highest honours, Honorary Fellowship. As distinguished engineers and technologists, they have each excelled in their professions and have made a vast contribution as pioneers of important areas in the engineering and technology industries. They should all be very proud of their achievements – with each award being extremely well-deserved.”

The awards will be officially given during Danielle George’s inaugural President’s Address ‘150 years of difference makers’ which takes place online today at 1pm.

 

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